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Resources in horses:
(1 to 20 of 85)

2005 Update: West Nile Virus in Horses

Information on West Nile Virus in horses, including how it affects horses, vaccinations, mortality rate, etc. 2 pp.

These files are part of the Michigan State University Extension archives to be used for historical reference, but not for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.

 



4-H 1072 4-H Horse and Pony Project Record Book

This document provides space for record keeping, project planning, inventories, income and expense records for the 4-H Horse and Pony project.

8pp.



4-H 1073 Stable Record Chart

This document is to be used with 4-H 1072 4-H Horse and Pony Project Record Book to keep records in the stable and with the totals carried forward to the project record book.

1pp.



4-H Proud Equestrians Program (PEP)

This web page offers detailed information on the 4-H Proud Equestrians Program (PEP), including ways to get involved with the program, what it is, learning materials, other resources, and training & events. HTML document.

1pp.



4H Colt Club Manual
MSU Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension 4-H Publications Club Bulletin 39

Nevels Pearson, Assistant State Club Leader; John Aldred, Graduate Student; Harry Moxley, Animal Husbandry
Issued June 1939 47 pages (Fil. 1)

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Michigan Extension office.

4H Light Horse Project
MSU Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension 4-H Publications Club Bulletin 71L

N.A.
Issued May 1958 24 pages (Fil. 1)

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Michigan Extension office.

A New Theory About Equine Foot Physiology

A Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine researcher has pieced together a new picture of equine foot physiology that suggests vascular systems in horse hooves function in much the same way that air- or gel-filled running shoes do.

These files are part of the Michigan State University Extension archives to be used for historical reference, but not for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.

 



Alfalfa for Horses

Agricultural Experiment Station
Michigan State University
Circular Publications CB65

R.S. Hudson, Farm and Horse
Revised  August  1931  11 pages  (Fil. 1) 

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For more information contact your local Extension Offices.



Alfalfa The High Quality Hay for Horses

MSU Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Bulletin e1777

Dr. Dwayne A. Rohweder, Professor of Agronomy, Raymond Antoniewicz, Assistant Professor of Meat and Animal Science (Equine) Extension, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Issued No Date 8 pages (Fil. 1) 

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.



Behavioral Considerations When Housing Horses
MSU Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Publications E3161

Livestock species all have different housing requirements based on their physical and behavioral needs as well as the amounts and types of exercise and activities in which they participate. If you prioritize the creature comforts of people over horses, you are sure to develop a facility that houses sick horses with behavioral problems. However, if you design a horse facility that provides a safe and healthy environment for the horse, you will ultimately have a functional and cost-efficient facility.

Christine Skelly MSU Extension Specialist, Michigan State University
July 2011, 8 pages

This publication is available from the MSU Extension Bookstore

Buying horse hay

This document was published by the University of Wisconsin with contributers from Michigan State University, University of Minnesota, and University of Illinois. In-depth discussion of the nutrient needs of horses, and the quality and cost of hay forage. Sections include the myths of feeding horses, horse's digestive system, nutrient needs of horses, selecting quality hay, which cutting to buy, hay preservatives, how much hay to buy, what is a fair price for hay, etc. 16 pp.

This bulletin is available from the MSU Extension Bookstore



Carcass Composting – A Mortality Management Option for Michigan Equine Owners
MSU Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Publications E3168

Horse owners may not be aware that composting — more specifically, open-static pile composting — is an acceptable and viable way to dispose of a horse carcass.

by Tom Guthrie, Dale Rozeboom

This publication is available from the MSU Extension Bookstore

Castration Concerns for the Equine Owner

Information on castration for the equine owner. Sections include prior to castration, castration procedure, post-operative care, etc. 3 pp.

These files are part of the Michigan State University Extension archives to be used for historical reference, but not for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.


Colic Risk Factors Identified

Provides a listing of risk factors for the development of colic in horses. 

These files are part of the Michigan State University Extension archives to be used for historical reference, but not for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.


Common Toxins in Equine Feedstuffs

Equine feedstuffs can be exposed to toxins during growth, harvest and storage. Plant disease, environmental conditions and insect infestation can all increase the likelihood of toxins being present in grains and hays. The possibility that a potential toxin will affect a species depends on its digestive system and eating behavior.

Equine AoE Team Christine Skelly, Ph.D., November 2008, 4 pages



Common Toxins in Equine Feedstuffs1

Equine feedstuffs can be exposed to toxins during growth, harvest and storage. Plant disease, environmental conditions and insect infestation can all increase the likelihood of toxins being present in grains and hays. The possibility that a potential toxin will affect a species depends on its digestive system and eating behavior.

Equine AoE Team Christine Skelly, Ph.D., November 2008, 4 pages



Controlling Horse Parasites

Cooperative Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Bulletin e174

B.J. Killham, Animal Pathology
Reprinted  December  1939   4 pages   (Fil. 1) 

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations.  For current recommendations contact your local Extension Office.



Controlling Insects and Mites on Horses

Cooperative Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Bulletin e834.

Donald C. Cress
Extension Specialist in Entomology

This publication provides information on controlling insects and mites on horses.

Issued May 1975 (Fil. 1)

4 pages

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office. Michigan Offices.



Determining Age of Horses by Their Teeth

Cooperative Extension Service
Michigan State University
Extension Bulletin e978.

Melvin Bradley, Professor Emeritus, Department of Animal Science
University of Missouri

This publication is about finding the age of horses by looking at their teeth.

Issued April 1977 (Fil. 1)
Issued September 1984 (Fil. 2)

4 pages

Archive copy of bulletin. Do not use for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office. Michigan Offices.



Do Electrolytes Really Help During Endurance Exercise?

Explanation of studies whose aim was to determine if electrolyte replacement during endurance exercise encouraged horses to drink more water, thus replacing more pounds of fluid lost as sweat. 

These files are part of the Michigan State University Extension archives to be used for historical reference, but not for current recommendations. For current recommendations contact your local Extension office.

 



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